Posts Tagged : audio visual

event technology solutions
Six Questions To Find the Perfect Event Technology Solution

Event technology is part of what makes events, conferences and exhibitions tick. From registration to content display and interactive elements, finding the perfect event technology solution puts you on the right track to a great event. With the event technology solutions and deployment so integral to success, it’s crucial to ask the right questions that lead to the appropriate solutions. A good audio visual supplier and event technology provider is there to help you make the most of what’s on offer and find innovative ways to use the latest technology to fuel every area of your event. As a starting point, here are six questions that will help guide you towards event technology that fulfills your goals for the perfect event technology infusion.

1. Who are your visitors?

Different audiences will have a different response to the types of technology on offer. Rather than categorising by age or gender, it’s important to look at the personas and interests of your audience as a whole. Those attending Mobile World Congress, for example, are much more likely to be fluent in terms such as virtual reality and will take to new technology with ease. Those at a medical congress or association meeting may not. Whether your audience are technology-focused or not, you can still find ways to infuse and enhance their experience through great pieces of technology and custom-developed software. The focus on how they use it and why will just be slightly different. Perhaps you need extra stand staff on hand to provide demonstrations, or a quick introduction video before the main feature. Understanding your audience and how they react and respond to technology will help you to choose the solutions that engage, rather than alienate your audience. If in doubt, think about your attendee’s every day life. Do they use technology? Are they a native mobile user? Did they grow up alongside social media? The profile you build will allow your audio visual supplier to tailor their event technology solutions to your event.

2. How much time do your visitors have?

One of the most underrated points of event technology comes down to how much time your visitors have to explore your event or stand. Video content that needs 20 minutes of a visitor’s time or an experience with a two-hour queue is not going to work if your visitors only have a 15-minute slot. If your visitors are limited on time or have a huge number of stands to get round try to condense the experience into minutes rather than hours. Interactive technology is a great way to this, as are totem screens which allows visitors to watch, learn or engage in seconds.

3. What is the best way to utilise your event budget?

We are finding more and more event budgets becoming ubiquitous, with less emphasis placed on ‘technology’, ‘registration’, ‘engagement’ and so on, as the different areas collide. One way audio visual partners can help their clients to make the most of their event technology is by looking at technology which transgresses more than one area. For example, an interactive videowall which allows visitors to register interest in specific areas will save the need for a separate lead capture tool. Similarly, the iPhones needed to run a mobile event app for 50 sales staff, are often cheaper when hired from the AV partner already working on your stand than they would be to buy or rent separately.

4. What are your pain points?

We believe that technology should do more than just look good within a stand. It should also work harder to solve some of the pain points that agencies are given within their initial event brief. Perhaps this is attracting more visitors to the stand through the use of realtime social media feeds or live content, or using virtual reality to really help visitors ‘get’ what the brand does and how it does it. There are many forms of audio visual event technology which can help provide solutions to customer problems which just can’t be rectified through design or static features alone. Asking yourself (and your event technology partner) what can be done to fix the things keeping you up at night. Then make the technology you use work a little harder to fix it.

5. What is the event’s legacy?

Part of what makes the events and exhibitions industry more sustainable, is ensuring that the event leaves a legacy behind that extends long after the event ends. Event technology solutions can often help provide this. One example is an NFC touch-solution which both provides a platform for a full event management system before, during and after the event as well as increasing interactivity and allowing for lead capture. Not only increasing interactivity during the event, but also providing a personalised follow-up post event, all within one solution. Learning how to extend the event legacy pre and post-event is a great way to make budgets last longer and gain a return on the investment made.

 6. Is the experience socially-connected?

Social media has become an event staple, used to bring visitors into the experience and make them feel part of the journey. Event technology can facilitate social media, allowing visitors to become socially-connected through an interactive Q&A system, live tweet wall, check-in system or live streaming. More recently, event planners and organisers are beginning to recognise the importance of social customer service. Increasingly, event participants are turning to Twitter and other social channels in order to ask questions and report issues.

 

If you need help finding the perfect event technology solution then speak to our team – we’d love to help or book you in for an ‘Event Tech Masterclass’ to bring your team up to speed.

 

 

The importance of partnerships in event marketing

Event marketing is a constantly evolving ecosystem and no one knows this better than event planners and the design agencies they work with. In such a competitive market, either on-stand at a tradeshow or wrapped up in a conference, brands are striving to stand out with their event marketing in order to make a mark on the minds of their customers.

The battle to be different has just one common denominator: the importance of working with reliable cross-channel partners. From audio visual suppliers, through to digital agencies, caterers, staffing and the event venues and organisers themselves, the partners a brand chooses can often have a huge impact on success.

 

The pressures

With events becoming an omni-channel experience, catering to event attendees across digital, offline and face-to-face as well as through multi-devices and channels can be difficult. Event marketing has grown and evolved inline with other marketing practices and in an ‘always on’ world, event planners are under more pressure than ever to deliver. Events need to have an integrated online and offline experience, often taking into consideration platforms such as social media, email and blogging. Attendees also expect to be able to access event content through video, imagery, podcasts, written posts or whichever channel suits their personal preference. Learning each discipline in enough detail to be able to execute it successfully in the lead up to an event as well as within a live environment is a job for more than one person. But finding the right suppliers and ensuring that they can work together when the lines between digital and social media, design and content are so thin, can be an arduous task.

 

Integrated budgets

Integrated budgets is one of the approaches that event planners, and the wider industry, are now using in order to smooth the workload and make cross-channel partners work together more seamlessly. Event marketing now encompasses more than just email or registration software. Instead, it is a living, breathing organism which needs to retain fluidity so that it can adapt to insights and data that help it to evolve in line with its visitor’s needs. Having a single budget for content, another for communication and yet another for staffing can cause problems. Finding a content partner who can produce video, which then needs to be shared by a social media partner and broadcasted by an audio visual supplier, creates budget crossover in every area. Defining an ‘event marketing’ budget which can then be broken down into tens, or even hundreds, of supplier areas is often the way to ensure that the pragmatics don’t hold back success.

 

Collaboration, collaboration, collaboration

As well as sharing budgets across disciplines, collaboration is essential to the success of cross-channel partnerships. With brands and event planners often employing more than one event supplier within the same area to contribute towards their event, smooth relationships and open communication is key to success. This is aided by a trend within events, where many suppliers are now becoming experts in one area rather than master of all. This doesn’t mean that they cannot branch out, after all an audio visual supplier will always be able to offer iPads and laptops alongside their more advanced visual screens and videowalls, but it does mean that some suppliers will highlight their expertise in a single area, over everything else. This type of approach will allow for more successful relationships between agencies, brands and suppliers as well as clearer expectations on the roles and responsibilities of each supplier contributing to overall event success.

 

Multi-event partnerships

As many agencies and brands will know, tendering to work on a brand’s event marketing can be longwinded and time consuming for all those involved. More importantly, by the time the tendering process is complete and an agency selected, the brand may have pivoted or changed direction completely, therefore rendering plans redundant. To avoid this, some brands are now working towards a multi-event partnership, where the same suppliers and agencies are employed for a rolling contract. The benefit of this is that the event marketing legacy lives on far beyond the event itself. Agencies and suppliers incentivised by a single year contract will often be working to fulfill that event’s aims and to make it the best possible experience. Those who are contracted to work on the event campaign for two, or even five, years are in a better position to look at the long-term strategy of a brand’s event marketing and ensure that every event is a cog in a long term plan for success.

 

The events world has always been an exciting place to be, but in the foreseeable future, event marketing is about to become even more poignant. Events which are more complex and more integrated require advanced skillsets and multiple suppliers, all willing to work towards a single goal. As long as suppliers and agencies can adapt accordingly and future-proof both skillsets and a flexible approach to multi-partner working, the impact on the event industry as a whole will be unparalleled.